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William Hickling Prescott House

The William Hickling Prescott House, at 55 Beacon Street, pictured on the left side, and the adjoining home at 54 Beacon Street, were built in 1808 for the Boston merchant, James Smith Colburn. These Federal period twin houses overlook Boston Common. The land was once owned by John Singleton Copley, America's most accomplished colonial portrait painter.

These 5 1/2 story brick town houses were designed by the esteemed American architect Asher Benjamin and are highlighted by two bow-fronts. Gracious geometric forms such as these accentuate the rhythm of the exterior design as well as create beautiful oval interior spaces. The building's Federal style features include a ground floor colonnade with delicate fluted Doric columns, elliptical fanlighted entrances with flanking side lights, colossal pilasters, elaborate iron balconies, and an ornamental balustrade over the cornice.

Quincy Homestead

A National Historic Landmark, the Quincy Homestead is significant for its role in early American history, for its architecture, and for its Quincy family association. The property, located at the corner of Hancock Street and Butler Road, is part of the original land that Edmund Quincy acquired for a farm in the 1630s. The present house, dating from 1686, was enlarged and enhanced over a period of more than 200 years. Its majestic Georgian frontispiece and gambrel roof, with distinctive dormer windows, give the building a stately and substantial appearance.

Martin House Farm

The Martin House Farm is a rare example of an 18th and early 19th century farm which still retains the character of its original setting. It consists of the house, two barns and cultivated fields surrounded by dry stone walls and woodlands.

The home was lived in continuously by members of the Martin family for over 200 years. In 1930 it was given to The National Society of The Colonial Dames in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts by Susan Taber Martin Allien, an eighth-generation Martin and a member of the New York Society of The Colonial Dames. In 1979 the Martin House Farm was placed on the National Register of Historic Places, an official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation.